August 14, 2019 - 10:20 AM EDT
Government of Canada highlights how Canada Summer Jobs program helps small businesses and youth across Canada
Government of Canada highlights how Canada Summer Jobs program helps small businesses and youth across Canada
Government of Canada highlights how Canada Summer Jobs program helps small businesses and youth across Canada

Canada NewsWire

MARKHAM, ON, Aug. 14, 2019 /CNW/ - Helping young Canadians get the skills and experience they need to start their careers is part of the Government of Canada's plan to build a strong, resilient workforce and grow the middle class. That is why the Government has doubled the number of jobs created through the Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) program since 2015, creating meaningful, paid work experience for more than 70,000 youth per year.

Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, along with the Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion, highlighted that over 8,000 small businesses in Canada received funding through CSJ to hire youth this summer, creating more than 19,500 meaningful job opportunities for young Canadians. This means that small businesses will get some much needed help during the busy summer season and will have an opportunity to grow their businesses.

The Government of Canada knows that small businesses are the backbone of the economy and creating paid summer work opportunities for youth strengthens the middle class. Through CSJ, young people gain the skills and experience they need to successfully transition into the workforce and small businesses benefit from new, young talent.

This year, the program was expanded to provide opportunities to gain quality work experience to all eligible youth across Canada aged 15 to 30, not just students. Over 85,000 Canada Summer Jobs were approved for funding in 2019.

Quotes

"Canada's young people are not just the leaders of tomorrow—they are leaders today. Our government believes that every young person should have access to opportunities to learn and develop skills that will increase their chances of finding meaningful employment. That's why we are focused on ensuring more young Canadians—including those at risk and facing barriers to employment—get the work experience they need to build their résumés and start their careers"
– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour

"Through the Canada Summer Jobs Program, more than 8,000 small businesses from coast to coast to coast have hired youth this summer. In Markham-Thornhill, this means more opportunities for young people to get the experience they need to enter the workforce in our country's high-tech capital. These summer jobs are helping to ensure that another generation of hard-working young people in Markham-Thornhill have the tools they need to follow their passion and succeed in doing so."
– The Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion 

"The Canada Summer Job program has been a fantastic resource for me. Without the funding from this program, I would have a difficult time being able to afford the employees needed to be open through the summer months. Because we are in a tourist area with a lot of festivals our hours are long and we sometimes need as many as three people in the shop at once. Without the funding it would be nearly impossible to operate effectively."
Sarah Gratta, Chief Curator, Too Good General Store

Quick Facts

  • Each year, the national CSJ priorities are determined based on the needs of the labour market and to reflect Canada's diverse population. This year's priorities support:
    • organizations that provide services to, or intend to hire, youth who self-identify as being part of under-represented groups or who have additional barriers to participating in the labour market;
    • opportunities for youth to gain work experience related to the skilled trades;
    • opportunities for youth in rural areas and remote communities, and official language minority communities;
    • small businesses, in recognition of their contribution to job creation; and
    • organizations that deliver supports or services to seniors.
  • At-risk youth are those who self-identify as being part of groups that are under-represented or have additional barriers to the labour market. These include:
    • recent immigrant refugee youth ("recent" is defined as having arrived in Canada in the past five years);
    • youth who have not previously been employed and for whom this would be their first job;
    • Indigenous youth;
    • youth with disabilities;
    • youth who have not completed high school;
    • visible minorities;
    • LGBTQ2 youth; and
    • women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).
  • The CSJ program is part of the Government of Canada's Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS), formerly called the Youth Employment Strategy (YES). Since 2005, the YES has helped more than 900,000 young people gain the skills and work experience they need to find and keep good-quality jobs.
  • In June 2019, Minister Hajdu announced the modernized YESS, which has been redesigned to respond to a range of labour market challenges faced by youth, particularly for those facing barriers to employment.

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SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada

View original content: https://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/August2019/14/c7595.html

For media enquiries, please contact: Véronique Simard, Press Secretary, Office of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, P.C., M.P., Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, veronique.simard@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 819-654-5611; Media Relations Office, Employment and Social Development Canada, 819-994-5559, media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.caCopyright CNW Group 2019


Source: Canada Newswire (August 14, 2019 - 10:20 AM EDT)